News Release

New Video Interview With Mayor Muoio on her Washington DC Effort

 VIDEO INTERVIEW IS A WEEKLY NEWSLETTER EXCLUSIVE!

April 27, 2013

(West Palm Beach, FL)  – West Palm Beach Mayor Jeri Muoio was in Washington DC this week fighting for federal dollars to pay for more police officers, pay for road improvements, and fund the city’s Youth Empowerment Center.  She also had several meetings regarding her opposition to the extension of State Road 7 into the city’s Grassy Waters natural preserve area.

One of the Mayor’s priority items is fighting for between $1.8 million to $2.3 million dollars to pay for additional police officers in the city. The funding would be part of the C.O.P.S. Hiring/Retention Bill. She is also pushing for $10 million dollars to pay for road and infrastructure improvements for North Flagler Drive. The project is expected to create over 80 local jobs.

Mayor Muoio is also hoping to convince lawmakers to set aside funding so the city can continue to be a leader regarding green initiatives.  She is seeking funding to pay for electric vehicle charging stations across the city, pay for the conversion of city vehicles to clean energy, and fund outreach efforts regarding water conservation, sea level rise and the use of clean energy.

Mayor Muoio arrived in the nation’s capital Tuesday afternoon. She spent two full days in meetings with several federal agencies including the Army Corp of Engineers, the U.S. Department of Transportation, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

She also met with several lawmakers to urge them to support funding these and several other projects that would benefit the residents of West Palm Beach. Among the projects is the city’s Youth Empowerment Center.

Also on the Mayor’s agenda were several discussions regarding the possible extension of State Road 7 into the city’s Grassy Waters Preserve area.  Mayor Muoio opposes the project, and has said previously that it would have serious negative impacts on both the city’s water supply as well as the natural preserve itself.

 
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