**City Commission & CRA Meeting Agendas | CLICK HERE**
MANDEL PUBLIC LIBRARY EVENTS for OCTOBER 2019

Here is a list of some of the activities coming to Mandel Public Library during the month of October.

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WPB Recaptured Meter Time Revenue Donated to Support Homelessness Prevention Initiatives

$15,000 dollars of recaptured meter time revenue goes to the Department of Housing and Community Development.

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GHG update 2013
CITY OF WEST PALM BEACH
2013 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory
 
As part of its ongoing efforts to be a leader in energy efficiency and sustainability, the City of West Palm Beach has updated its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory, comparing its 2013 results to an original 2008 baseline. This inventory measures total energy consumption and GHG emissions from two categories: municipal government operations and the community at large. Measuring emissions is an important component of managing the City’s contributions to climate change and identifying where the greatest opportunities exist to reduce those impacts. This 2013 GHG inventory is the first update since the 2008 baseline inventory and serves as a significant milestone in documenting the City’s progress toward sustainability.
 
 
PROGRESS SINCE 2008
 
Over the past five years, West Palm Beach has demonstrated significant progress in reducing GHG emissions. For government buildings and operations, emissions dropped by 11 percent, from 81,834 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO₂e) in 2008 to 72,489 metric tons in 2013. This reduction is equivalent to the emissions from the electricity use in 1,285 homes2. This 11 percent reduction represents
a downward trend in emissions that demonstrates the City is well on track to meet or potentially exceed the reduction target established in its Sustainability Action Plan of 19 percent by 2018.
 
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1 The baseline GHG emissions numbers from 2008 have been revised for both municipal operations and community scale to reflect consistent methods and data sources and a fair comparison between 2008 and 2013 results.
2 US EPA Greenhouse Gas Equivalencies Calculator.
 
At the community scale, emissions decreased by five percent, from 5,513,890 metric tons of CO2e in
2008 to 5,256,748 in 2013. This shows an overall improvement for West Palm Beach. In fact, all sectors decreased and community emissions are trending lower than forecasted compared to a Business As Usual (BAU) scenario from 2008 and a scenario that includes both reduced emissions from motor
vehicles and a 30 percent waste diversion plan. However, to meet the reduction targets established in the City’s Sustainability Plan, it is clear that the City will need to target improvements at the community scale, especially with regard to transportation, the largest source of emissions at the community scale, f it is to realize reductions comparable to those achieved within its own government operations.
 
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GOVERNMENT
 
The City of West Palm Beach’s municipal operations were responsible for the emission of 72,489 metric tons of CO2e in 2013, which is equivalent to the annual emissions created by providing energy to approximately 6,614 homes for one year. The breakdown of emissions by sector is listed in Table 1 below. Wastewater treatment (including both process emissions and facility energy-related emissions) is responsible for the largest source of government GHG emissions (38%), followed by municipal solid waste operations (19%). Given the contribution that these two sectors make to total GHG emissions, it is promising to see a reduction in both, particularly the 27 percent reduction in solid waste emissions.
 
 
 
Table 1: Government GHG Emissions, 2008 compared to 2013
 
 
SECTOR
2008 emissions
MT CO2e
2013 emissions
MT CO2e
% Total
2013
Emissions
 
% Change since 2008
Change in
MT CO2e since 2008
 
% Change per capita
Wastewater
(facilities and process)
 
 
27,479.96
 
 
27,215.16
 
 
38%
 
 
-1%
 
 
(264.79)
 
 
-6%
 
Solid Waste
 
18,888.14
 
13,773.64
 
19%
 
-27%
 
(5,114.50)
 
-31%
Buildings &
Other Facilities
 
8,218.78
 
8,428.06
 
12%
 
3%
 
209.28
 
-2%
 
Vehicle Fleet
 
7,908.36
 
5,554.74
 
8%
 
-30%
 
(2,353.62)
 
-33%
Employee
Commute
 
5,092.58
 
3,867.97
 
5%
 
-24%
 
(1,224.61)
 
-28%
Streetlights &
Outdoor
Lighting
 
 
4,433.10
 
 
4,101.31
 
 
6%
 
 
-7%
 
 
(331.78)
 
 
-12%
Water Delivery
Facilities
 
9,813.15
 
9,547.98
 
13%
 
-3%
 
(265.17)
 
-7%
TOTAL 81,834.07 72,488.86 100% -11% (9,345.21) -16%
 
 
 
Energy Savings at Warren Hawkins Aquatic Center
 
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Smart energy management practices at the Warren Hawkins Aquatic Center have produced significant energy and associated GHG emissions savings. By heating the pool only seasonally instead of year‐round, natural gas use was cut by 85%, saving $23,000 annually.

The City had an increase in emissions from energy used in buildings and other facilities (a category which excludes water and wastewater facilities). There is an important context to understand with regard to the increase in this sector. The City has made a significant investment
in energy efficiency upgrades through a performance contract. While these upgrades have produced significant energy savings in the buildings where upgrades were completed, there were significant changes to the City’s overall building portfolio after the baseline year of 2008. One change was the opening of the City Center and closing of the old
City Hall, a library, and a few other facilities. Despite the closing of those inefficient buildings, the new City Center, containing numerous government
offices, operations, and two parking
 
garages, has meant a net increase of approximately 860,500 kWh annually. In addition, the City has also opened numerous facilities in the Waterfront District, including a new Visitor Center. These changes to the City’s building portfolio have been worthy investments and have been designed to both operate efficiently and improve the efficiency with which the City provides services to its citizens. When considered on a per capita basis, emissions from government buildings and other facilities decreased by
 
two percent. Therefore, the City should not be discouraged by the increase seen in energy and emissions in this sector, but instead focus on the success of reductions achieved despite growth. The City should utilize best practices and lessons learned from these efforts to continue to grow efficiently while providing excellent services to its residents and businesses.
 
In particular, the City has realized significant reductions in the Fire Department facilities, including a total reduction of 426,250 kWh, an emissions reduction of 253 metric tons of CO2e, and cost savings of approximately $40,000 per year. A number of parks and recreation facilities have also achieved significant savings as a result of building efficiency improvements. The City has also achieved a 7.5 percent reduction in the streetlights and outdoor lighting sector for an emissions reduction of 332 metric tons of CO2e and cost savings of approximately $45,000 per year. This is primarily due to upgrades of all City-owned streetlights to more efficient technologies, including LED and induction lighting. The use of
natural gas to heat buildings and other facilities also decreased by 68 percent, due in large part to a more efficient heating schedule for the pool at the Warren Hawkins Aquatic Center. To realize even greater reductions in this sector, the City will need to implement improvements to other outdoor lighting, including lighting at parks and recreational areas.
 
COMMUNITY
 
The community inventory includes emissions generated by all residences and businesses within the City of West Palm Beach, including government operations. The sources of these emissions are from electricity, natural gas, and fuel oil used in buildings, fuel from the transportation sector (based on vehicle miles traveled), decomposition and incineration of solid waste occurring within city limits, and process emissions from the treatment of wastewater. The total community-wide emissions from the City of West Palm Beach in 2013 were 5,256,748 metric tons of CO2e. This is equivalent to the annual emissions from providing energy to more than 479,630 homes for one year. The breakdown of emissions by sector is provided in Table 2, with all categories showing emission reductions from 2008 to 2013. The
transportation sector was responsible for the largest share of emissions (63%), which makes it a target for future reduction strategies.
 
 
 
Table 2: Community GHG Emissions, 2008 compared to 2013
 
 
SECTOR
2008 emissions
MT CO2e
2013 emissions
MT CO2e
% Total
2013
Emissions
 
% Change since 2008
Change in
MT CO2e since 2008
 
% Change per capita
Solid Waste 1,198,181 1,060,797 20.2% -11% -137,384 -16%
Transportation 3,341,650 3,320,705 63.2% -0.6% -20,945 -5%
Commercial
and Public
Energy
 
 
604,902
 
 
540,137
 
 
10.3%
 
 
-11%
 
 
-64,766
 
 
-15%
Residential
Energy
 
353,100
 
328,280
 
6.2%
 
-7%
 
-24,820
 
-12%
Industrial
Energy
 
15,387
 
6,287
 
0.1%
 
-59%
 
-9,100
 
-61%
Wastewater
(process only)
 
670
 
543
 
0.0%
 
-19%
 
-127
 
-23%
TOTAL 5,513,890 5,256,748 100% -5% -257,142 -5%

NEXT STEPS
 
The 2013 GHG emissions inventory demonstrates much progress on the City’s sustainability goals. However, as West Palm Beach, like the rest of Florida and the country, emerges from the recent recession, growth and increased economic activity can result in increased emissions if the City does not continue to implement strategies that enable it to grow efficiently. The results of this inventory update show that targeting government buildings for efficiency upgrades will be an important opportunity for improvement. In addition, the large contribution of the transportation sector to community emissions demonstrates a significant opportunity for community-scale reductions if efforts are made to reduce vehicle miles traveled within West Palm Beach. This will, of course, need to be considered within a
regional context and in coordination with neighboring communities. Strategies that reduce energy use and GHG emissions within the transportation sector have the co-benefits of improving air quality, improving mobility, and enhancing community well-being. The City should also continue to lead by example by reducing emissions from transportation through strategies that improve efficiency of its own municipal
fleet.